SOURSOP THE MIRACLE FRUIT

SOURSOP THE MIRACLE FRUIT
Also known as graviola, soursop (Annona muricata) is a large prickly, heart shaped green colored fruit growing in tropical regions. It is covered with ridges on the outside and has a soft juicy flesh inside. It resembles a custard apple and is dark green when raw. As it ripens, it becomes slightly soft and light green externally. Thus, this fruit is closely related to custard apple and cherimoyas in terms of appearance and flavor. Its white pulpy flesh contains small shiny black inedible seeds and has a sweet, acidic taste. Seedless varieties of soursop are rarely available and generally have a fibrous flesh. Due to its creamy texture, it is often used in beverages, ice creams, and other sweet foods. The skin of the fruit is inedible, but the white fleshy part is quite nutritious. The seeds should never be eaten as they are toxic in nature. The tips of the prickles of ripe soursop fruit break off easily. Under-ripe fruits can be stored in the dark until they ripen fully.